The Cleanest Line

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    « October 2007 | Main | December 2007 »

    Creating the Future Patagonia National Park

    Patagonia catalog subscribers should be seeing the Holiday 2007 issue in their mailboxes now. Entitled "Conservacion Patagonica," the catalog showcases both gift ideas from our winter clothing line and the story surrounding the creation of Patagonia National Park in Chile.

    Founded by former Patagonia, Inc. CEO, Kristine Tompkins, Conservacion Patagonica is a non-profit organization dedicated to the protection of wildland ecosystems and biodiversity in the Patagonia region of Chile and Argentina. Join Kristine as she narrates this video about Conservacion Patagonica's efforts to create the future Patagonia National Park.

    To date, 50 employees from all parts of Patagonia the company have traveled in groups of six to help with the creation of the park (a group is there now), and we’ll keep lending our hands until the work is done. Visit concervacionpatagonica.org if you'd like to head south and volunteer yourself, or learn more by reading some firsthand accounts from Patagonia employees who’ve been there: The De-Fence of Patagonia, A Letter from Chacabuco, Wild South, and From Pulling Fence to Enlightenment.

    [With thanks to Malinda and Lu]

    Dirtbag Fitness

    What is "fitness," exactly? Trainers, elite athletes, and the polished exercise-club crowd have one idea. It involves things like resting heart rate, VO2 Max, reps-per-minute, lactate thresholds . . . lots of numbers. The “fitness” they’re talking about can be measured, quantified, and presumably, understood once the right numbers have been crunched. Beckey

    But wait a second.

    Folks submit some pretty cool pictures to our catalog. When's the last time you looked at one of those pictures and thought, “Wow, look at the sustained heart rate on that guy!”? No doubt, it takes a certain level of fitness for the folks in Patagonia photos to get themselves to the beautiful places where the cameras find them. But in looking at the pictures, it seems that fitness—the cardio-pumping, number-crunching, calorie-counting type—falls somewhere well outside the frame.

    [Legendary dirtbag, undoubtedly fit. Fred Beckey still climbing long past what most consider to be retirement age. Photo: Eric Draper]

    Continue reading "Dirtbag Fitness" »

    Protecting the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

    If you receive Patagonia email alerts – or as I like to call them "e-nugs" (sign-up today, you won't regret it) – your Inbox is more than likely housing our latest email encouraging action on behalf of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.

    Back in September, the Alaska Wilderness League’s Executive Director, Cindy Shogan, and writer/photographer, Jonathan Waterman, came to Patagonia Ventura to speak to the employees about the ongoing fight over the Refuge. After the presentation, we asked Cindy and Jonathan to summarize their presentations for this short video.

    It's time to end this fight. Take action now to help permanently protect the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge by designating it Wilderness.

    [With thanks to Alyssa, Maile, Tim and Stuart]

    Take a Last Look

    Ycryndashots_013_2 Rare to see YC holding a fish out of water for even a second but this 26 pound Zolotaya River chromer required closer inspection. This Russian beauty had been caught on the nearby Rynda two summers ago and blue-tagged to identify it as a product of Rynda waters -- proof of salmo salar's wandering capabilities, and what happens to salmon when allowed to swim freely and spawn repeatedly without estuary nets or pen farming. Maybe the Canadian government will take the hint before the entire Skeena drainage is lost for steelhead and the eastern province rivers no longer hold Atlantics.

    Ycryndashots_006_3

    [Photos: Bruce McNae; with thanks to Way Upstream]

    Keeping Alternative Transportation on the Radar

    In case you've been missing it, Democrat-sponsored Clean Energy legislation is up for a vote soon. Late Thursday night, word came down that Congressional leaders are considering dropping the mandates for clean energy alternatives.

    It's a matter of days before the votes are cast, so time is running out to let your Senators and Representatives know where you stand on Clean Energy, and the measures you think Americans must take to make it a reality.

    Among the measures being considered in this bill are funds to support Americans who wish to use alternative transportation. Apparently, not everyone in Congress is ready to believe the lengths Americans are ready to go to in their attempts to achieve energy independence. Have a look at this short video clip of Rep. McHenry's (R, NC) reaction to a portion of the current energy bill:

    The video can also be seen here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ip8nozp7vs8

    What do you think?  Feel free to leave a comment, but more importantly, make sure to share your two cents with your representative(s).

    Your Thoughts on The Footprint Chronicles - Part 3

    Footprint 0ur Footprint Chronicles were intended to ignite conversation every bit as much as corporate introspection. And the comments are starting to roll in. Below, you'll find some intriguing thoughts from among the very first responses we received to the Footprint Chronicles. In the interest of helping to zero-in our own focus on big issues, we've broken comments out into three separate themes: Materials, Energy Use, and Labor.

    In previous posts, comments focused mostly on issues pertaining to the Materials we use and the Energy involved in clothing production within a globalized economy. Today, we're considering some of the questions customers have asked us about where we make our goods.

    Continue reading "Your Thoughts on The Footprint Chronicles - Part 3" »

    Two Weeks in Chile with ForestEthics

    Billboard Back in January, Patagonia paid me to go to Chile for two weeks to volunteer with ForestEthics, a North American-based environmental group working to preserve and protect native forest. My name is Jim Little. I’m an editor here at Patagonia, and one of 21 employees last year who took advantage of one of the coolest programs this company offers.

    My goal was to help ForestEthics advance the story of its work in Chile. The actual result of my internship turned out to be different, but perhaps even more helpful in the greater scheme of things. If you’re interested in Chile and its amazing landscapes, read on to hear about my experience. If not, no problema.

    [“We plant a lot more than we harvest,” reads a roadside billboard. What it doesn’t say is that large native trees are harvested, and the forest replanted with non native seedlings that offer nothing to local fauna and flora. Photo: Jim Little]

    Continue reading "Two Weeks in Chile with ForestEthics" »

    Your Thoughts on The Footprint Chronicles - Part 2

    Footprint0ur Footprint Chronicles were intended to ignite conversation every bit as much as corporate introspection. And the comments are starting to roll in. Below, you'll find some intriguing thoughts from among the very first responses we received to the Footprint Chronicles. In the interest of helping to zero-in our own focus on big issues, we've broken comments out into three separate themes: Materials, Energy Use, and Labor.

    In Monday's post, comments focused mostly on issues pertaining to the Materials we use. Today, we're considering some of the questions customers have asked us about the Energy required to do business globally.

    Continue reading "Your Thoughts on The Footprint Chronicles - Part 2" »

    Yosemite Trip

    by Lynn Hill

    Deanmarimike I just arrived home from a brief but pleasant trip to Yosemite Valley, where I was invited to give a presentation at the AMGA (American Mountain Guides Association) annual meeting. The fall colors were splendid and the climbing temperatures ideal. It was a coming home of sorts, I met up with my old friends, Mari Gingery, Mike Lechlinski, and Dean Fidelman, who were part of my community of friends living in Southern California during the late 70's and 80's. We enjoyed every opportunity possible to climb and hang out together and in retrospect, it seems fitting that it was with Mari and Dean that I first climbed the Nose in 1979.

    The following year, Mari and I teamed up for another ascent on El Cap on a spectacular route called, the Shield. Known as a relatively difficult aid route at the time, some of the guys doubted our chances of making it to the top and said things like, "Get ready to rescue those girls up there." But Mike, Mari's boyfriend of the last thirty-five years, was the only one besides us, who was confident that we would make it to the top.

    [Dean, Mari and Mike share a laugh. Photo: Lynn Hill]

    Continue reading "Yosemite Trip" »

    Your Thoughts on The Footprint Chronicles

    Footprint_2 0ur Footprint Chronicles were intended to ignite conversation every bit as much as corporate introspection. And the comments are starting to roll in. Below, you'll find some intriguing thoughts from among the very first responses we received to the Footprint Chronicles. In the interest of helping to zero-in our own focus on big issues, we've broken comments out into three separate themes: Materials, Energy Use, and Labor.

    It's an organic process, one that will take shape as we dive into all of the questions that come with trying to do a sustainable business on a threatened planet. But make no mistake: this is your conversation. Your thoughts, passions, and inspired ideas about sustainability are welcome. It's our hope that as the discussion unfolds, we'll hear new ideas to help guide the continued examination of our corporate life. 

    Please read, comment, and write us with your own thoughts. Please read on for some recent comments and questions about our Materials sourcing. Look for comments about Energy Use and Labor later this week.

    Continue reading "Your Thoughts on The Footprint Chronicles" »

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