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    « February 2011 | Main | April 2011 »

    A Different Kind of Fish Report

    Davis_t_0824 Patagonia Fly Fishing Ambassador, Dylan Tomine, brings us today's post - an update on the current state of the seafood industry as seen from a seat at the 9th Annual Seafood Summit in Vancouver. He attended this year's Seafood Summit, along with Yvon Chouinard, who provided the gathering's keynote address. Here are Dylan's observations from the gathering:

    - Vancouver Seafood Summit 2011
    March 2nd, 2011

    I took some time off from winter fishing, wood cutting and book work to attend the 2011 Seafood Summit, an annual gathering of fish industry people, conservation NGOs, scientists and journalists from around the world.

    The Summit is remarkable in that long-time adversaries are willing to spend the time and money to talk about how we might make the seafood industry more sustainable. What was once a small get-together of conservation orgs is now sponsored by High Liner Foods, one of the largest seafood processors in North America. Hats off to the folks at SeaWeb, who organize and host the event, for bringing everyone together. Here are a few observations from Vancouver:

    [Yvon Chouinard. An avid fly fisherman who has plied the waters in virtually every corner of the globe, he provided the keynote address to attendees of this year's Seafood Summit. Photo: Tim Davis.]

    Continue reading "A Different Kind of Fish Report" »

    No Exposed Bone (and a Marg recipe)

    Cordes - JW rap2 Shingu(LR) First off, I’m talking about my ankle. My cankle, still swollen from my broken leg and part of my next round of surgeries on Monday. My final surgeries, inshallah, making six in a little over a year. I’ve had enough. Should be minor, removing most of the hardware store in my lower leg, trimming my knee and cleaning-up my ankle. Should help my mobility. But there’s a chance they’ll find exposed bone on the weight-bearing surfaces of my ankle and have to micro-fracture, putting me back into a hellish recovery. Again. Doctors Hackett and Clanton, world-class surgeons at the Steadman Clinic, who focus on high-end athletes (thus begging the question of how I got in…), fully get it, know my climbing plans, and we’ve got a good plan. Clanton suggested we print T-shirts saying “No exposed bone.” I love it. But I started growing a hemlock tree, just in case.

    It’s just that I’ve been, I don’t know, down too long in the midnight sea. Like those times when you feel like you’re the Last in Line. It’s like being stuck 3,000 feet up something and you have to get down, but you just chopped one of your ropes. In which case, here’s a trick I’ve used to still do full-length rappels:

    [To getting down safely and enjoying good margs. Photo: Kelly Cordes]

    Continue reading "No Exposed Bone (and a Marg recipe)" »

    Operation Algeria – The Essential Clothes

    by Brittany Griffith

    Hotcoldhotcold

    “March is a killer month in the Sahara. Temperatures rise and fall with such rapidity that the body has difficulty adjusting.” This sentence from the book I was reading (The Conquest Of The Sahara, by Douglas Porch) made me more anxious than the current kidnapping news. How was I to pack two weeks of clothes into an MLC for our climbing trip to southern Algeria, knowing the temperatures there could rise and fall by up to 70 degrees Fahrenheit?

    [Leaving the shade and entering the hot sun near the top of Nouvelle Lune, a 900-foot route on Tizouyag Sud. All photos: Jonathan Thesenga & Brittany Griffith]

    Editor's note: Fresh off her trip to Algeria with Jonathan Thensenga, Brittany Griffith shares her clothing choices for climbing in the desert. Most of the links cover both genders so men can benefit from these recommendations too. As with all product posts, availability can be limited. Don't hesitate to contact Customer Service if something you're interested in isn't available on Patagonia.com.

    Not only would I need to pack clothes what were incredibly (impossibly?) versatile, I needed the clothes to be durable and resilient. I’ve been on climbing trips to the African desert before (Mali) and realize how scarce water is, so I knew that washing my spoon, much less my clothes, would be completely out of the question. After much thought (best described as fretting), I ended up with neat, little stacked piles of clothes all over my bedroom. Here’s what they were:

    Continue reading "Operation Algeria – The Essential Clothes" »

    Just Released - 2011 Patagonia Fly Fishing Digital Catalog

    Patagonia_fly_fishing_2011

    Like you, we’d rather spend our time on the water, eyeing the arc of a line through air, feeling the push of current against our legs, inhaling the damp earth along a riverbank. But if you can’t immerse yourself in the river, try wading into our latest digital catalog: full of beautiful photos, compelling stories and all of our new, extensively revised fishing gear, it’s nearly as good as coaxing a trout from a willow-lined stream.

    Catch your copy of our digital Fly Fishing Catalog

    [Peacock pyrotechnics just gets the heart racing. Agua Boa River, tributary of the Amazon, Brazil. Photo: Barry & Cathy Beck]

    On the Road with Solitaire

    Mbrown_Solitaire100722_DSC4349 In the high desert of South America, winter takes hold, devouring bleached bones and abandoned shacks. Into these most inhospitable of lands, a handful of drifters emerge from the whiteout, ready to cast their lot on forsaken peaks both merciless and magnificent. Venturing beyond the frontiers of most mountain films, Solitaire is backcountry riding forged in the tradition of Western cinema. Born in the spires of Argentina’s legendary Las Lenas, a lonely two-year journey begins through an abandoned world, wandering the length of a continent from Peru’s Cordillera Blanca to Chilean Patagonia.

    Lost in the winds of snowbound badlands and the blizzards of primordial forests; seen from a horse’s saddle and a paraglider’s wings; ridden on ski and board and telemark...

    Mbrown_Solitaire100722_DSC4410 [Today, we're pleased to bring you the first in a series of posts from Nick Waggoner and the crew at Sweetgrass Productions. They're currently hard at work on their third movie, Solitaire, and have graciously invited Cleanest Line readers to join them on their journey to produce their most ambitious film to date. The story just gets better as it unfolds; hit the jump to keep reading and check the first trailer from the upcoming film. And don't forget to check back: Sweetgrass will be releasing updates on the 21st of each month. - Ed]

    Solitaire fuses western-inspired tales of backcountry gambles into landscapes never before visited on film.

    Or so goes the elevator speech for our new film Solitaire: fairly romantic, dreamy, concise. But it doesn’t tell the full picture, and neither will the film itself. Because before any polished product meets the light of day, there are a million complications to overcome on the back end, infinite catastrophes exploding on a daily basis that one can only hope to steer in the right direction. South America itself often seems to operate on a similar program, teetering right on the edge of insanity-- more often than not-- but somehow always holding the course.

    [All images courtesy Michael Brown and Sweetgrass Productions]

    Continue reading "On the Road with Solitaire" »

    Dirtbag Diaries: Sodade

    Publish_the_quest_half_logo Our sports transcend languages. Ever seen two climbers mime the sequence to a boulder problem? Smiles between skiers on a powder day? Our passions become a vehicle to explore a world outside of our own. Jacob Bain has traveled to SE Asia, Cuba, and Africa. And though he sometimes has climbing gear, he always has a guitar. Through music, Jacob has jammed with locals, incorporating the new sounds and experiences into his music. In the summer of 2010, Johnny Fernandes invited Jacob and his band Publish the Quest to Cape Verde to partake in a musical experience as part of his goal to preserve the local music. Can a hook, a line and a new take on a traditional song overcome culture and language barriers? –Fitz Cahall

    Audio_graphic_20pxListen to "Sodade"
    (right-click to download - contains expletives)

    Visit dirtbagdiaries.com to hear the music from "Sodade" or download past episodes from the podcast. You can subscribe to the show via iTunes and RSS, or connect with like-minded listeners on Facebook and Twitter.

    Btn_music_app-on And don't forget, you can listen to The Dirtbag Diaries as well as the New-Music Stream Fitz mentioned on our new Patagonia Music iPhone App.

    Don't Wait for Good, Go Find It

    There always something unpleasant in the news. Worse, this queue of sad stories is never-ending; the high notes don't last long before they're pushed off the front page to make way for the latest updates about unfolding unrest of some kind or another. That makes news like the kind we're sharing today that much sweeter. It's an update from patagonia friend and adventure photographer, Trevor Clark, about a cool new project he's working on. He's set aside paying work in hopes of capturing a story about some good being done in the world.

    Trevor's project is unique for a number of reasons, but the one that got our attention was this: it's an assignment he's given himself, based on his belief in the power of positive stories.

    Obviously, a photographer needs to sell their pictures to make money. The odds are of doing this are greatly increased when said photographer can go on-assignment for a publication. Trouble is, "[in the current economy] no magazine is going to pay to send me to Africa no matter how good the story is," says Trevor.

    He went anyway. No money. No promises. Just the belief that a good story deserves to be told.

    Continue reading "Don't Wait for Good, Go Find It" »

    In Haida Gwaii

    Haida_gwaii_joecurren_18

    I’d been dreaming about Haida Gwaii for as long as I could remember. Or, if not quite as long as I could remember, at least since my time as a skinny, bespectacled kid in public school, staring wide-eyed at the Haida totems in front of the Royal British Columbia Museum. In more recent years, with the spectacles gone, I’d been captivated by John Valliant’s book The Golden Spruce and Michael Nicoll Yahgulanass’s Haida manga, and I’d spent hours looking at photos of a perfect, sand-bottom point that some friends of mine had scored on a fishing and hunting trip. It had taken a long time to get to a place that figured so prominently in my imagination, so I couldn’t keep a grin from spreading across my face as I looked out from the window and realized I was almost there.

    Editor's note: Canadian writer and surfer, Malcolm Johnson, joins us again with a beautiful story from a mystical island chain. Photos by Malcolm and Santa Barbara surf photographer, Joe Curren 

    It had been just after sunrise when I climbed onto a Pacific Coastal flight that morning, pulling a toque over my ears to cut the propeller noise as the familiar shapes of the South Island slipped away. A few hours later, somewhere above the reefs and inlets of the Central Coast, I got my first glimpse of the archipelago formerly known as the Queen Charlotte Islands—off in the faintest distance, the high mountains of Gwaii Haanas appearing as a broken blue line above the horizon to the west.

    [Winter rainbow in Skidegate. Photo: Joe Curren]

    Continue reading "In Haida Gwaii" »

    Alert Level Orange

    Cordes - dangerous man I’m excited and worried about my Pakistan trip later this summer. Most people are good people, I think, but still, the world is a dangerous place. Then again, so is sitting on the couch with your seatbelt buckled. What to do?

    My Pakistan fears have nothing to do with jihadis, and everything to do with my body. I can’t wait, and my only apprehension regards this seemingly foreign notion that I could ever be healthy and climbing again, able to go to these beautiful places and embrace risk and feel alive. A privileged worry, indeed. I’m making huge strides in rehab, and I’ll be fine.

    It’s weird, how fear gets politicized and commercialized. Danger lurks at every corner, beware: nothing is what it seems. I’m a cynic, so convince me otherwise but fear sells, baby, fear sells.

    [The world is a dangerous place…but I am a dangerous man. Photo: Kelly Cordes]

    Continue reading "Alert Level Orange" »

    Buy a Song, Benefit the Environment - Introducing Patagonia Music and the Patagonia Music Collective

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    I'm very excited to announce a brand new philanthropic collaboration for us: Patagonia Music. We've teamed up with a diverse group of world-class musicians to raise funds for environmental activism. The concept is simple: Buy a song, benefit the environment. Artists donate exclusive Benefit Tracksyou won't find these songs anywhere else – you buy some great music, and every Benefit Track purchased raises much-needed funds for non-profit environmental groups. Together we form the Patagonia Music Collective. Preview all Benefit Tracks.

    Btn_music_app-on How do you hear the music? Visit our new Patagonia Music page and launch the pop-up music player. You can also download our new Patagonia Music iPhone App right now, for free. If you hear a song you like, click the right arrow for the link to purchase it on iTunes.

    Hit the jump to see the complete Patagonia Music Collective launch line-up. We'll be adding new artists and exclusive songs frequently. [Featured artists in photo: Pearl Jam, Bonnie Raitt, Philip Glass, Ziggy Marley]

    Continue reading "Buy a Song, Benefit the Environment - Introducing Patagonia Music and the Patagonia Music Collective" »

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