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    Well-Groomed and Powerful, "Groundswell" is Headed Your Way

    by Chris Darimont, Raincoast Conservation Foundation



    Groundswell – a new film by Chris Malloy of Patagonia, Farm League Productions, and Woodshed Films in conjunction with the Raincoast Conservation Foundation – is setting out out on tour. It's a small film about making a big stand. 

    Groundswell features world-class surfing of Patagonia’s Trevor Gordon, Dan Malloy and Chris Malloy. Canadian phenomenon Peter Devries also joins Raincoast aboard their 70-foot sailboat to discover what the remote coast of British Columbia, Canada, has to offer – and why it must be protected. Together with local indigenous leaders, this group gives voice to a coast in peril from a proposed Tar Sands pipeline and associated oil tanker traffic.

    Take_action_largeUpdate 2: The full-length version of Groundswell is now available at The Surf Network. Profits from the sale of this film are being donated to Raincoast Conservation Foundation.

    Update:
    The tour is almost over (photos after the jump) but you can still be a part of this amazing project. Take Action through the Raincoast website and add your voice to the Groundswell of opposition against oil tanker traffic on the Great Bear Sea. We hope to have news on a digital viewing option from The Surf Network soon.
     

    Continue reading "Well-Groomed and Powerful, "Groundswell" is Headed Your Way" »

    San Diego 100 Race Report: Course Record Run

    by Jeff Browning

    Two weekends ago, I had the ridiculously good fortune to watch Patagonia Ultra Runner Jeff Browning put on a display of trail running zen mastery at the San Diego 100. One could not ask for a better experience and the fact that so many friends had gathered for the event made it all the sweeter. Patagonia runners Krissy Moehl, Luke Nelson, Roch Horton, and Ty Draney joined Jeff and the other 150 souls brave enough to toe the line for 100 miles of dessert scrub, buff pine forests, intense heat, dust, wind, poisonous snakes, technical down hills and endless grueling climbs that make this a five-star, class-A event. A special thank you is definitely due to Scott Mills, the Race Director, and the dedicated crew of San Diego Rats who know how to put on a great old-school race that should definitely be on every serious runner’s list. Read on to hear the story of Jeff’s record-breaking journey in his own words. I guarantee you’ll be inspired. –George Plomarity, Patagonia Grassroots Sales and Marketing Rep

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    Stonewall Peak at mile 60ish of the course. We went up and over this bad boy. Photo: Jeff Browning Collection

    Where do I start. Wow. What a day. I truly had “one of those days” where it all clicked. I’m SO pumped to have PR’d on a technical course for 100 miles. I can’t say enough about the race itself. Super-well organized, well-stocked, well-marked and hot and technical. Fun course.

    The Course

    The course is held 40 miles inland in the mountains east of San Diego. There is 15,800 feet of elevation gain. The course is known for being pretty technical, exposed (no trees) and windy. June is usually hot, typically in the 80s and windy on the ridge, and 90s in the canyons. The hardest part is that, after mile 15, you NEVER, ever have shade until 72 miles into the race. The course starts and finishes at Al Bahr Campground on Sunset Highway and does a loop SW and then connects to the PCT (Pacific Crest Trail) and runs north hovering on a ridgeline between 4,500 and 6,000 feet overlooking the Anza Borrego desert to the east. The course then heads west and down into Noble Canyon (the hot part of the course) for a figure eight loop and back up Green Valley to the ridgeline and the PCT. Then a northern loop along the shore of Lake Cuyamaca, over Stonewall Peak and then down the drainage paralleling Hwy 79 as it descends toward San Diego, then back up to gain the ridge (at mile 51/80) and take the PCT back 20 miles south to finish at Al Bahr.

    Continue reading "San Diego 100 Race Report: Course Record Run" »

    Celebrating Bike to Work Week 2012 - Cheddar, Challenge, Cold & Cops

    Every day is bike to work day at Patagonia, but we still love to celebrate Bike to Work Week around the company each year. Enjoy a recap of the 2012 festivities and make your own switch to a pedal-powered commute. We'll start with a story from mom and managing editor, Diane French.

    I have a four and three-quarters year-old son (don’t be rounding that down or up or you’ll hear about it). That means everything in my house has a name. There’s Craney, the toy crane; Jadey, the jade plant; JuJu the pillow. Bikes, especially, have names. Orange Crush, my orange crossbike; Twilight, my townie; Fire Flame was Amato’s first pedal bike; now we have Blue Stash, his second. The blue trail-a-bike that I attach to Twilight to haul Amato to preschool is named Blueberry.

    And then there’s Cheddar.

    Continue reading "Celebrating Bike to Work Week 2012 - Cheddar, Challenge, Cold & Cops" »

    Dirtbag Diaries: Live From 5Point Vol. 4

    by Fitz & Becca Cahall

    DBD_5Point_Live_vol4.jpgWelcome to the second half of our 2012 Live From 5 Point show (here's the first half). This week we continue the show from Steve's Guitars in downtown Carbondale, CO. Photographer Ben Moon presents his story about overcoming cancer, the community that rose up to support him and his thoughts on fear. Veteran alpine climber Mark Richey recounts the incident that almost took his climbing partner's life during their ascent of Sasser Kangri II. Colorful language included.

    Audio_graphic_20pxListen to "Live From 5Point Vol. 4"
    (mp3 - right-click to download - contains some expletives)


    Visit dirtbagdiaries.com for links to download the music from "Live From 5Point Vol. 4" or to hear past episodes of the podcast. You can subscribe to the show via iTunes and RSS, or connect with the Dirtbag Diaries community on Facebook and Twitter.

    For more on Ben Moon, read our pre-festival interview with the supremely talented photogrpaher.

    [Graphic by Walker Cahall]

     

    Surfilm Festibal 10 Kicks Off May 31 in San Sebastián, Spain

    by Patagonia Surf Europe

    Poster2012Patagonia is proud to support another year of the Surfilm Festibal in Donostia - San Sebastián, Spain. This year is particularly special because the world’s first surf film festival celebrates its 10th anniversary.

    Patagonia ambassador Keith Malloy will be on hand to present Come Hell or High Water and participate in a really unique workshop. Extended Vision: Moving Image Workshops starts on June 6th and will allow up-and-comers to work hand in hand with some of the sport’s best filmmakers.

    Continue reading "Surfilm Festibal 10 Kicks Off May 31 in San Sebastián, Spain" »

    An Interview with Photographer Ben Moon

    by Emily Nuchols

    BIO_benmoon_026

    Chances are if you’ve perused the Patagonia website or catalog, you’ve caught sight of a few of Ben Moon’s images. From surfing and climbing to capturing the music scene, the self-taught Moon took the photography scene by storm more than a decade ago.

    Moon’s work will be featured this weekend at the 5Point Film Festival in Carbondale, Colorado. I caught up with Moon in between travels at his home-base in Portland, Oregon and asked him a few questions.

    [Above: Portrait of Ben Moon in SE Portland, Oregon. Photo: Ryan McDonald]

    Emily: What did you have for breakfast this morning?

    Ben: I love to eat, so breakfast is a great excuse to get rolling on that early in the day. While I’m home, I usually make a green juice first thing in the morning with kale, an apple, a lemon, and fresh ginger. I’m not into big meals because I can’t be productive during a food coma, so a “second” breakfast follows soon after, along with yerba maté to keep the day moving.

    Continue reading "An Interview with Photographer Ben Moon" »

    Justin Clifton’s 5Point of View - Catch the Film Festival April 26-29 in Carbondale

    by James Edward Mills

    JustinClifton

    The 5Point Film Festival has a new executive director. Justin Clifton spent six years on staff with the Mountain Film Festival in Telluride. Last summer he came over to the Roaring Fork Valley where he’s applying his expertise and vision to guide an exceptional adventure media event in Carbondale, Colorado. In advance of this four-day mountain movie menagerie, set to start on April 26th, Clifton shared a few thoughts on his new role and what we can look forward to on the cinema scene in 2012. [Photo: Ben Knight]

    James/Joy Trip Project (JTP): You spent a lot of time working over at Mountain Film. In your opinion, how does that festival compare to 5Point?

    Clifton: The way that I’ve been explaining it succinctly has been that Mountain Film is very much a festival that is activism on the back end. It’s a festival that really is doing a wonderful job of highlighting the problems in the world and talking about things that people need to care about. It truly is an activist film festival. 5Point is not an activist film festival, but it is on the front end of activism. It’s more about connecting people to the wilderness, the outdoors and these places that they’re going to fight (for) and protect for the rest of their lives. That’s the biggest difference that I see. Mountain Film has gone pretty far away from just programming for the adventure community or the outdoor market. They’re kind of spreading their wings a bit more. 5Point to me is fairly rooted in providing a place where that community comes together in a meaningful way.

    Continue reading "Justin Clifton’s 5Point of View - Catch the Film Festival April 26-29 in Carbondale" »

    Alpine Mentors - A Unique Opportunity for Young Alpinists

    by Steve House

    House_blanchard_josephson

    On March 25, 2010, nearly two years ago now, I was climbing the north face of Mount Temple when a hold broke and I fell some eighty-feet. Far enough to break my ribs in 20 places and my pelvis twice.

    As I lay on the ledge near my partner, Bruce, I quickly got very very cold as my body shunted blood away from my hands and feet and into my core and brain. I felt the agonizing sensation of my own breath getting shorter and shorter as my chest cavity filled with blood due to the numerous fractures.
     
    By this time, Bruce had used our cell phone to call for a rescue, and two hours later I was plucked off the wall by a warden (and coincidentally a friend of mine) on a cable 100 feet below a Parks Canada helicopter.

    Two hours is a long time to think. Long enough for the adrenaline to wash away, long enough for it to feel like a very long time. Long enough to weigh your regrets. To tell Bruce all the things you’re thankful for. The names of all the people you Love.

    During the ensuing months of convalescence I remembered one particular question that had come to me during my wait: Were there climbs I’d wished I’d done, and hadn’t? As the summer rolled by in a blur of narcotics, wheelchairs, and physical therapy I kept coming up with the same answer to my question: No, it was not more climbing that was missing from my life. Chief on the list was to do more for my community, and from this intention Alpine Mentors was born.

    [Above: Steve House, Barry Blanchard and Joe Josephson, from their 1996 attempt at Mount Robson’s Emperor Face. "Though unsuccessful, the trip was my rabbit hole into the world of high-end alpinism with climbers who had done it before." Photo: Steve House Collection]

    Continue reading "Alpine Mentors - A Unique Opportunity for Young Alpinists " »

    The Fifth Annual Dirksen Derby Supporting Tyler Eklund

    by Aimee Lyn Brown

    Terje_Derby01

    Right about the time contest organizer and Patagonia snowboard ambassador Josh Dirksen yelled go, professional snowboarder Scotty Whitlake fell over laughing, legend Terje Haakosen cracked a smile and 28 shreds of all ages and genders grabbed splitboards and took off running uphill in shitty snow and poor visibility for no prize money and nothing but bragging rights, was when I fell back in love with snowboarding. The best part? I wasn’t alone.

    [Above: Burton team rider Terje Haakonsen on the descent. Photo: Aimee Lyn Brown]

    Continue reading "The Fifth Annual Dirksen Derby Supporting Tyler Eklund" »

    Special Places: Hyalite Canyon

    by Kelly Cordes

    Some places seem special, and I can’t always articulate why. I think it’s the smell of the air, the look of the place, the memories it holds. In a sense, Hyalite Canyon, near Bozeman, Montana, one of countless canyons in the American West of similar scale, isn’t extraordinary. Until you begin to unlock its secrets, which include over 200 ice and mixed pitches, and an incredible history of human experiences.

    Gambino - hyalite002
    [Pete Tapley on an early attempt at what would become Zack Attack, with Kelly Cordes belaying. Photo: Dan Gambino]

    This weekend is the 15th annual Bozeman Ice Climbing Festival, and so I got to thinking of writing about their festival, but the festival exists because the place exists, the memories exist, the legacy of Hyalite that has influenced so many of us. Me included, and in so many ways. One of the first places I learned to climb ice, some 18 years ago, was Hyalite. And Hyalite was the last place that I climbed waterfall ice – on February 1, 2010, the day I shattered my leg.

    Continue reading "Special Places: Hyalite Canyon" »

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