The Cleanest Line

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    preOCCUPATIONS - A Short Film Series About People Who Do What They Love for a Living

    By Chris Malloy



    I’ve always noticed that people who have “dream jobs” are too preoccupied with their passions to realize they even have an occupation. That’s were our little film series preOCCUPATIONS comes from. All of the characters we spent time with were very different, but they share one common characteristic: they are driven by the love for what they do, not the size of their paycheck.

    The team behind this project includes young filmmakers and musicians who, like the subjects, are making a run at figuring out how to do what they love for a living. We hope you enjoy this series, but even more so, we hope these characters inspire you to find your passion and run with it.

    Chris Malloy is a Patagonia ambassador and the director of preOCCUPATIONS. You can see more of his work at Woodshed Films.

    Returning to the Source – Rediscovering Wild Places and the Wild Child Within

    By Brett Dennen

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    I grew up in a camping family. We never went on any vacations that didn’t involve sleeping bags and mountains. My parents would pack up their three kids and we’d pile into our green VW bus and head into the high country, where we could truly be wild children. When I was five, my dad built a canoe and most of our camping trips after that involved paddling around a lake.

    I started backpacking when I was ten, the first year I went to Camp Jack Hazard. CJH is a high Sierra Nevada summer camp, where kids learn backpacking and leadership skills. Being a kid at camp in the mountains was always the highlight of my summers. My dad recognized the fact that I loved backpacking so he started taking me along on trips he’d plan with his friends. At the age of 14, I started working at CJH, becoming a wilderness leader. I learned to play the guitar so I could sing songs around the campfire. That’s where I first fell in love with the idea of being a musician. Playing folk songs high up in the mountains. I continued working at CJH every summer until the age of 22.

    [A five-year-old Brett in the canoe his dad built. Photo: Brett Dennen Collection]

    Continue reading "Returning to the Source – Rediscovering Wild Places and the Wild Child Within" »

    The Infamous Stringdusters Open 2013 American Rivers Tour at Outdoor Retailer Summer Market

    By The Infamous Stringdusters & American Rivers



    Having just been dusted at the Telluride Bluegrass Festival, I couldn't be more excited to hear about this tour in support of American Rivers. Check out the press release and tour dates below; you don't want to miss this band. Video: The Infamous Stringdusters
     
     
    Grammy-nominated bluegrass outfit The Infamous Stringdusters are getting set to embark on their 2013 American Rivers Tour, an epic summer music adventure stopping through, and winding down, some of America’s wildest and most beloved rivers and surrounding communities. For the journey, The Infamous Stringdusters are partnering with the nation’s leading river conservation organization, American Rivers – currently celebrating its 40th anniversary – to raise money and awareness for protecting and restoring rivers and clean water nationwide.

    Continue reading "The Infamous Stringdusters Open 2013 American Rivers Tour at Outdoor Retailer Summer Market" »

    Register to Vote Here – It’s National Voter Registration Day

    by Andy Bernstein

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    Presidential elections are the most popular and least popular event in America. In 2008, 131 million Americans voted for President. That's three times as many people as watched the Oscar's. A full 90 percent of registered voters turned out and more than four out of five young registered voters cast a ballot in 2008, marking the largest total turnout in history.
     
    But that leaves about 70 million eligible Americans who sat it out. Think everyone you know votes? Think again. Across the board, in every demographic, people choose to let others decide who should determine the future.
     
    There are many reasons for this. When unregistered voters are asked why they aren't registered, about half say they just don't care (give them points for honesty). But that leaves over a huge swash of Americans who found the voter registration system too confusing or missed the deadlines and didn't register for that reason.

    [Above: Jack Johnson breaks his no-social-media rule for National Voter Registration Day. http://bit.ly/registertovotejackjohnson]

    Continue reading "Register to Vote Here – It’s National Voter Registration Day" »

    Dirtbag Diaries: Stepping Stones

    by Fitz & Becca Cahall

    DBD_Ep58Jessie Stone has a resume that would make any dirtbag proud -- raft guide, pro whitewater kayaker and member of the US freestyle kayak team. At the end of that list is medical doctor. And the director of the Soft Power Health Clinic in Uganda. She is a career shape shifter. who followed her passions and ended up in an unexpected place. How do you know when it's time to step out of the current and follow an alternative path? Trevor Clark traveled to Uganda to tell Jessie's story.

    Audio_graphic_20pxListen to "Stepping Stones"
    (mp3 - right-click to download)


    Visit dirtbagdiaries.com for links to download the music from "Stepping Stones" or to hear past episodes of the podcast. You can subscribe to the show via iTunes and RSS, or connect with the Dirtbag Diaries community on Facebook and Twitter.

    [Graphic by Walker Cahall]

     

    One Planet, One Vote – Patagonia Teams Up with Wilco, HeadCount and League of Conservation Voters

    Hans LIsa M 2“The environment is where we live, where we work, and where we play,” said Dana Alston, a pioneer in the environmental movement. It is also, we think, any place you love.

    Your special place might be Yosemite Valley. Or it might be the smallest pocket park in your neighborhood. The place you work might need cleaner air or more trees; the place you live might need better transportation.

    We need leaders committed to the places we live, work, and play – and the places we love.
    The “environment” is abstract, and, sometimes, at the polls, it’s ignored. During elections, the “environment” is cast in opposition to other needs, as if “the environment” were a luxury we could put aside.

    But, the environment is not abstract: it’s where we live. It’s the air we breathe. It’s the water we drink. It’s the places we go to relax and refresh. It’s the beauty and diversity of our one planet Earth.

    A healthy planet is necessary for a healthy business and Patagonia wants to be in business for a good long time. We want to act responsibly, live within our means, and leave behind not only a habitable planet but an Earth whose beauty and biodiversity are protected for our children and grandchildren.

    That’s the reason Patagonia has a stake in this election. We plan to bring our deepest values with us into the voting booth in November and elect responsible leaders. We hope you’ll join us.

    Continue reading "One Planet, One Vote – Patagonia Teams Up with Wilco, HeadCount and League of Conservation Voters" »

    Ryan Montbleau Raises His Voice for Louisiana Wetlands

    by Ryan Montbleau

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    As a New England boy through and through, I have to ask myself: what if over the last 80 years, Rhode Island had washed away into the sea and was now completely gone? That is essentially what has happened to Louisiana's coastal wetlands since the 1930s. Over 1,880 square miles of land have been lost during that time (an area significantly larger than Rhode Island), thanks in large part to the policies of human beings.

    [Above: Musician and voice of the wetlands, Ryan Montbleau. Photo: Ryan Laurey]

    Continue reading "Ryan Montbleau Raises His Voice for Louisiana Wetlands" »

    Dirtbag Diaries: Origins

    by Fitz & Becca Cahall

    Editor's note: Hard to believe it's been five years since The Dirtbag Diaries was born onto the Internet. There have been so many good stories, so many inspiring people. Now, we can't imagine an Internet (or this blog) without them. Thank you Fitz and Becca for all your hard work. And thank you to the fans of the show for your passionate support. Here's Fitz and here's to five more years:

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    The Dirtbag Diaries turns five. This also happens to be our 100th episode. To celebrate the occasion, we reached out to our collaborators, our contributors and our friends and asked for ideas. I pitched them a bunch of ideas. They shook their heads. Their response was resounding. "We want to hear your story, the story of the Diaries," they said. Our intern, Austin Siadak, stepped forward to do the interview and relay the story. The tables were turned. By nature, we like our creation stories simple. An idea appears in the void.  A light bulb goes off. The apple hits Sir Isaac Newton on the head. In reality, creation stories are messier, more complicated and more interesting than abbreviated elevator pitches. They are a sum of parts. So here goes.

    Audio_graphic_20pxListen to "Origins"
    (mp3 - right-click to download)

    Visit dirtbagdiaries.com for links to download the music from "Origins" or to hear past episodes of the podcast. You can subscribe to the show via iTunes and RSS, or connect with the Dirtbag Diaries community on Facebook and Twitter.

    [Graphic by Walker Cahall]

    Buy a Song, Benefit the Environment: New Benefit Tracks from Patagonia Music

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    Looking for some good music to enjoy over the long President’s Day weekend? Love supporting grassroots environmental groups? You're in luck! A bunch of new Benefit Tracks have been added to Patagonia Music:

    • "AMEN (LIVE)" by Edens Edge benefits Urban Farming
    • "THE WANDERING (ACOUSTIC)" by Ryan Bingham benefits Surfrider LA
    • "DON'T GIVE UP (LIVE)" by Green River Ordinance benefits Urban Farming
    • "TONIGHT" by Sugarland benefits Surfrider LA
    • "ODETTA" by Joe Henry benefits Friends of the Los Angeles River
    • "DJEGH ISHILAN (LIVE)" by Tinariwen benefits Nevada Wilderness Project
    • "SLOW DOWN" by ¡MAYDAY! benefits ECOMB
    • "OPEN THE ROADS" by Chuck Ragan benefits Gulf Restoration Network

    Each one of these songs is exclusive to Patagonia Music -- you won't find them anywhere else -- and at least 60% of the proceeds will benefit the associated environmental group. Visit Benefit Tracks to preview these songs and more.

    If you’re looking for a good mix to stream from your iPhone or computer, hit up the New Music Stream and launch the Patagonia Music Player, or download the free Patagonia Music app for your iPhone. Note: Patagonia Music is only available in the United States.

    Have a great weekend everybody.

    The Master's Apprentice - Yvon Chouinard on Climbing with Fred Beckey

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    In honor of the release of Fred Beckey's 100 Favorite North American Climbs from Patagonia Books, we assembled this short podcast. Have a listen and you'll hear Patagonia's founder, Yvon Chouinard, talking about his alpine apprenticeship with sensei Fred Beckey in 1961.

    Audio_graphic_20pxListen to "The Master's Apprentice" by Yvon Chouinard
    (mp3 - right-click to download)

    This story first appeared in Alpinist 14, winter 2005. For more epic climbing stories, visit alpinist.com to subscribe to the magazine.

    The featured music is William Elliott Whitmore performing his song "Hard Times" a Patagonia Music Benefit Track for Urban Farming and their mission to create an abundance of food for people in need by planting, supporting and encouraging the establishment of gardens on unused land and spaces. Head over to Patagonia Music to hear more podcasts and more benefit tracks for non-profit environmental groups.

    Fred Beckey's 100 Favorite North American Climbs
    is available now from Patagonia.com and select book sellers. In the book, Fred offers up his characteristic mix of route tips, natural history and climbing lore for his 100 favorite climbs (with honorable mentions of a few more) -- it's the magnum opus of America's most prolific first ascensionist. Check out Patagonia Books for more titles.

     

    One Percent for the Planet
    © 2010 Patagonia, Inc.