The Cleanest Line

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    Harvesting Liberty: A short film about growing hemp in the USA

    By Dan Malloy & Jill Dumain

    Industrial hemp is a crop that has the potential to lower the environmental impacts of textile production, empower small-scale farmers and create jobs in a wide variety of industries. Two non-profit groups, Fibershed and Growing Warriors, are working to reintroduce industrial hemp into Kentucky—and eventually U.S. agriculture. Dan Malloy and a small film crew from Patagonia paid a visit to farmer and military veteran Michael Lewis to see how it was going.

    Above: Watch our new short film, Harvesting Liberty. Video: Patagonia

     

    Take_action_largeTAKE ACTION

    On July 4, 2016, a petition will be delivered urging Congress to pass the Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2015/2016 (S.134 and H.R. 525) legalizing the cultivation of industrial hemp in the United States. We invite you to learn more and take action at the National Hemp Association.

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    Bike to Work Week 2016: Remembrance of Rides Past

    By Gavin Back

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    With another National Bike to Work Week upon us, we have once again worked on events to celebrate pedal-powered commuting at the Patagonia D.C. in Reno, Nevada. Every year we reward dedicated bikers and try to inspire more people to begin burning calories instead of fossil fuels. This year we are even more excited than usual because we now have on-site child care. While the children are, for the moment, too young to actively participate in Bike to Work Week, we look forward to including them in future years. In the meantime, we are stoked to be contributing to an environment that makes cycling the norm rather than the pastime of a few MAMILs (Middle-Aged Men in Lycra).

    Above: A group of Patagonia Reno employees ride into work on a beautiful bike path. Photo: Tyler Keck

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    Mālama Honua: Hōkūleʻa’s Voyage of Hope

    By Jennifer Allen

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    “He waʻa he moku, he moku he waʻa,” is a Hawaiian proverb, meaning, “The canoe is an island, the island is a canoe.”  

    Centuries ago, Polynesian voyaging canoes were tools for survival, enabling islanders to find food and settle new lands. Life on the canoe was a microcosm of life on land. Everyone needed to care for one another and for the canoe in order to survive. The clearest modern-day expression of this truth is the Hawaiian double-hulled sailing canoe, Hōkūleʻa.

    Hōkūleʻa is sailed without modern instruments, using only the sun, moon, swells, birds, winds, and stars as natural guides. Her practice is one of pure sustainability, her mission, fully inspired. Since launching from Hilo in May 2014, Hōkūleʻa has crossed three oceans, four seas and eleven time zones—stopping in over fifty ports to connect with communities who care for the health of the oceans and our shared island, Earth. This worldwide voyage is known as Mālama Honua—to care for earth.

    Above: Sailing for over forty years now, Hōkūleʻa has ignited a sailing canoe renaissance in island communities throughout Polynesia. Photo: John Bilderback    

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    On the Road Again: Notes from the Spring 2016 Worn Wear Tour

    Words and photos by Donnie Hedden

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    I had forgotten about the highway head turns and hollars, the uncompromising loyalty to garments that are decades older than me, the vastness and variety of this continent. The chorus of Worn Wear sentiments sing: on the road again.

    Editor’s note: Oregon, British Columbia and Nevada residents can still catch Delia (the repair wagon) and the Worn Wear crew at a stop near you. Check the tour dates for details.   

    Above: Kern gets his kicks after a long drive. Photo: Donnie Hedden

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    We Can Be Both: Mothers at Work

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    Every day in America, women return to work after the birth of a child to find an unsupportive environment lacking on-site child care, lactation programs and paid medical leave. No wonder there is an alarming lack of women in positions of leadership, board rooms and public office. Women will never be able to effectively “lean in” without the proper economic, social and community support for the most critical work of all: raising the next generation. 

    Above: Taking a break from child care to hang out with mom. Patagonia HQ. Photo: Kyle Sparks

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    “Real Life” Science

    By Dylan Tomine

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    Both of my kids love their science classes in school, and Skyla often mentions wanting to be a marine biologist when she grows up. So when the field biologists from the Wild Fish Conservancy invited us to participate in some beach-seine sampling, as part of their project to assess juvenile salmon habitat around Puget Sound, we jumped at the opportunity.

    These guys were incredibly friendly and patient with the kids, happy to explain each process as they captured individual fish, measured and recorded them without harm, then placed them into another bucket for release once the netting was done. A great lesson in how science works in the field and the importance of consistent methodology.

    Above: Frank Staller, field technician for the Wild Fish Conservancy, explains the sampling process to Skyla and Weston. Puget Sound, Washington. Photo: Dylan Tomine  

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    The 2015–16 Patagonia Season ‘Patagonia d’Or’

    By Rolando “Rolo” Garibotti

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    While many historic climbs occurred this past season, if I were giving awards, my “Patagonia d’Or” would go to a selfless and lasting non-ascent.

    The momentum began in late 2014, with climber Steffan Gregory, who sent me an email: “I’m looking at returning to Chaltén next season and wanted to put some time in giving back. I am curious if you know if there is anything in the works regarding waste management. I’d be willing to write a grant for funding or help with an existing project.”

    Above: Descending from Cerro Fitz Roy we can see Laguna Capri in the center-right portion of the photo. The team chose to build their wilderness latrine at Laguna Capri because of its popularity with hikers and relatively close proximity to El Chaltén. Patagonia, Argentina. Photo: Dörte Pietron

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    Dirtbag Diaries Podcast: A Slosh in the Bucket

    By Fitz & Becca Cahall

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    Eric Johnson lives in Sturgis, South Dakota with his wife and three young daughters. He works as a high school English teacher. He’s responsible—well, most of the time.

    Half way into his thirties, Eric emptied his retirement account to buy a raft, despite the fact that he lives in a state without any navigable whitewater. Just over a year later, he found something too good to be true: a group of experienced guides advertising an open spot on a pre-season trip down Idaho’s Main Salmon.

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    Witness

    By Diane French

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    Fifteen minutes before my wedding, I’m standing in front of my sister in my dress. “Can you see it?” She scans me, tilting her head to each side. “No. Can’t see it. But here, take this anyway.”

    Two hours from now, when the hailstorm rolls in and turns my lips purple for all my wedding pictures, I’ll be wearing the brown wool wrap she’s handing me. But for now it’s draped over my arms to hide the road rash acquired just this morning on our pre-wedding mountain bike ride with the wedding party, when I clipped a handlebar in tight trees and ate it in the rock-choked dirt.

    Above: Between a rock and a hard pace, Diane French digs in for the stair section of the Backbone Trail. Salida, Colorado. Photo: Sacha Halenda

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    Patagonia Supports Paid Leave. You Should Too.

    Patagonia supports employees with paid leave to care for themselves or an immediate family member. We do it because it’s the right thing to do for employees and their families–and because it’s good for our business. But this kind of support is far too uncommon in the United States, where just 13 percent of workers have access to paid family and medical leave. We’re the only industrialized country without a law that gives workers paid leave when serious family or medical needs arise.

    Above: Patagonia Supports Paid Leave. You Should Too. Video: Patagonia

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