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    Don’t Wait for Good, Go Find It – Full Circle

    by Laurel Winterbourne

    Cover_1

    The world needs GOOD stories. Fortunately there are people like Trevor Clark who put it all on the line, travel thousands of miles and spend countless hours, days and months to get these stories out there. Trevor is an outdoor adventure photographer and friend of Patagonia who decided that he wanted to tell stories that mattered to him.

    After meeting Jessie Stone and hearing her story, there was no question in Trevor’s mind that this story needed to be told. Jessie is a professional whitewater kayaker and medical doctor who went to Uganda to paddle the Nile, but what she saw, changed the course of her life and the lives of many others.

    [Above: Dr. Jessie Stone is a member of the US Freestyle Kayak Team and a Medical Doctor. In 2004, she founded Soft Power Health to provide malaria education, prevention and control for the people of Uganda. Video frame: Trevor Clark]

    Continue reading "Don’t Wait for Good, Go Find It – Full Circle" »

    Three Rooms – Packing 101 with The BAG

    by Brittany Anne Griffith

    Boatload

    This may sound weird, but I love packing. When essentials are limited to two 50-pound bags – what a van can carry – a 40-liter backpack, or even just a carry-on, the things you think you need to take versus the things you actually do take is a fun game for me.

    My most recent trip had a slightly different take on our typical domestic climbing adventure and my packing volume was restricted to a boatload – literally. We were going to take a boat down southern Utah’s Green River, camp on a sandbar, prepare Thanksgiving dinner, and climb desert towers. That’s a lot of shit to remember to bring, and it all had to fit on a raft. We would be somewhat remote, a day’s boat ride and drive from Moab, so forgetting an essential could range from a hassle to devastating. JT gave me his short list as he rushed out the door to work the day before we left: pruning shears, axe, hatchet, waders, two each of #4, #5 and #6 Camalots, and three cases of beer. I don’t know what concerned me more: the request for an axe or that we might be climbing something that would require all that wide gear.

    [Packing the boat along the shores of the Green River. Photo: BAG’s iphone]

    Continue reading "Three Rooms – Packing 101 with The BAG" »

    Deep Water Video Series – Ocean Adventures with Kohl Christensen



    Kohl Christensen's life balances the search for the biggest waves with building and farming at home in Hawaii. Deep Water, a new short video series, follows Kohl and his friends as they chase huge surf around the world.

    Hit the jump to watch episodes two and three.

    Continue reading "Deep Water Video Series – Ocean Adventures with Kohl Christensen" »

    Led By The Winds & Sea

    by Belinda Baggs



    This was a slide show titled "Led By The Winds and Sea" presented on a tour of Japan in August 2012. We were honoured that people enjoyed a little insight into our family's adventures.

    Belinda Baggs is a Patagonia surf ambassador from Australia’s Sunshine Coast. You can read more from Belinda and the Patagonia Australia crew on the Patagonia Australia Journal or follow her family's adventures at On The Road with Rayson. Music by Todd Hannigan.

    Well-Groomed and Powerful, "Groundswell" is Headed Your Way

    by Chris Darimont, Raincoast Conservation Foundation



    Groundswell – a new film by Chris Malloy of Patagonia, Farm League Productions, and Woodshed Films in conjunction with the Raincoast Conservation Foundation – is setting out out on tour. It's a small film about making a big stand. 

    Groundswell features world-class surfing of Patagonia’s Trevor Gordon, Dan Malloy and Chris Malloy. Canadian phenomenon Peter Devries also joins Raincoast aboard their 70-foot sailboat to discover what the remote coast of British Columbia, Canada, has to offer – and why it must be protected. Together with local indigenous leaders, this group gives voice to a coast in peril from a proposed Tar Sands pipeline and associated oil tanker traffic.

    Take_action_largeUpdate 2: The full-length version of Groundswell is now available at The Surf Network. Profits from the sale of this film are being donated to Raincoast Conservation Foundation.

    Update:
    The tour is almost over (photos after the jump) but you can still be a part of this amazing project. Take Action through the Raincoast website and add your voice to the Groundswell of opposition against oil tanker traffic on the Great Bear Sea. We hope to have news on a digital viewing option from The Surf Network soon.
     

    Continue reading "Well-Groomed and Powerful, "Groundswell" is Headed Your Way" »

    Armenia Bound

    by Majka Burhardt, with Kate Rutherford

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    Any climbing trip starts with a conversation. Kate and mine went something like this.

    Kate: “What’s your fall look like?”
    Majka: “October’s wide open.”
    Both of us: “Want to go somewhere good?”

    We considered Norway but were scared off by the rain; Germany was a strong contender but neither of us wanted to drink that much beer; and as crack climbers (aka sport climbing on tufas feels demoralizing) we were seeking a new ascetic in both the climbing lines and the surrounding culture.

    [Above: The basalt columns of Armenia. Photo: Gabe Rogel]

    Continue reading "Armenia Bound" »

    In Dag We Trust – A Rock Climbing Trip to Turkey's Ala Dag Mountains

    by Jonathan Thesenga

    Parmakayya

    “You’re going sport climbing at Antalya?” That was the question nearly everyone asked me when I told them that Brittany and I were headed to Turkey for a three-week climbing trip. A fair assumption – you gotta dig into a third or fourth level of research before you read about any sort of climbing in Turkey besides the bolt-clipping paradise of Antalya. A cushy sport-climbing vacation to the Mediterranean coast, however, was not in the travel plans this time around – we were headed for central Turkey’s Ala Dag Mountains, a Teton-esque range of rugged limestone peaks, walls and spires.

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    [All photos by Jonathan Thesenga (@jthesenga).]

    Continue reading "In Dag We Trust – A Rock Climbing Trip to Turkey's Ala Dag Mountains" »

    Slow is Fast, Part 2 – Biking and Surfing down the California Coast

    by Dan Malloy

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    In the last month I have learned more about the people and places along the California coast than I had in 34 years and a thousand trips by car.

    Maybe slow is fast.

    We have been on the road for five weeks now and we are thoroughly convinced that we have found the fabled confluence of old California and new California.

    The bummer is, it’s not a physical place and the only way we seem to be able to track it down is by bike. I don’t really understand why. Every time we hit the road pedaling good things just start happening, strange coincidences, random happenings, happy accidents and all-around ridiculous stuff. If I tried to explain it you might think I was on something. So, I’ll save the explanation of this epiphany and post a few photos from the most recent leg of our trip, San Francisco to San Luis Obispo. [Editor's note: Get caught up with Slow is Fast, part 1.]

    [Above: This one is for the FCD crew, who after the first post asked me to stop barrel dodging. A warm and friendly day at the great white petting zoo. Photo: Kanoa Zimmerman]

    Continue reading "Slow is Fast, Part 2 – Biking and Surfing down the California Coast" »

    Slow is Fast, Part 1 – An Attempt at Going on a Mini Adventure in My Own Backyard

    by Dan Malloy

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    After being on the road for a good part of the last 15 years, I have a lot of catching up to do at home. The truth is, for about ten of those years I didn't  think twice about California, never felt home sick or that I was missing a thing. Well, that time has passed. I am not sure if I'm just getting older or whether I've figured out that there are a 100 lifetimes worth of adventure here at home.

    A while back I had an idea that seemed like a really fun way to see our coastline like I do the far away coastlines that I have visited over the years. I mentioned it to two friends and they were all in, planning and packing, and all of the sudden the trip was on.

    So, three weeks ago, Kanoa Zimmerman, Kellen Keene and myself jumped on a train headed north with bicycles, a surfboard, wetsuits, flippers, a microphone and a couple cameras. The idea was to surf down the coast by bike, staying with friends, family and acquaintances, poaching camps when we had to, doing our best to earn our keep and to learn from folks that are doing good work and getting by along the California coast.   

    Here are a few photos from the trip so far.

    [Above: Dan Malloy and his rig. All photos by Kanoa, Kellen and Dan] 

    Continue reading "Slow is Fast, Part 1 – An Attempt at Going on a Mini Adventure in My Own Backyard " »

    Unplugging to Get in Touch - A Kiteboarding Dispatch from the Tuamotus

    by Jason Slezak

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    There is something I love about recording a voicemail greeting that says I will be out of the country, with no cell phone access, for a few weeks. Usually included is the customary, “You can try to reach me by email…” but even that was questionable. This time, I’d be traveling somewhere so remote it’s basically be off the grid. And that “something” I love about the voicemail? It actually has more to do with everything that leads up to the point of making the recording.

    The weeks of pre-planning and packing were over. The hours and hours of watching swell charts on the Internet, hoping to see a solid blob of swell pop up in the proper direction, and the incessant studying of wind graphs and forecast sites to determine what size kites and boards to take had all passed. The stresses of showing up late (as always) for the airline check-in, the roulette wheel of excess baggage fees and the long security lines had faded into faint memories. I sent my last farewell texts to family and friends, and finally, switched my phone and my contact with the everyday world… OFF.

    [Jello-blue lagoon, Ninamu. Photo: Jason Slezak, GoPro]

    Continue reading "Unplugging to Get in Touch - A Kiteboarding Dispatch from the Tuamotus" »

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